Shamnad Basheer

Shamnad Basheer

Prof (Dr) Shamnad Basheer founded SpicyIP in 2005. He is currently the Honorary Research Chair of IP Law at Nirma University and a visiting professor of law at the National Law School (NLS), Bangalore. He is also the Founder of IDIA, a project to train underprivileged students for admissions to the leading law schools. He served for two years as an expert on the IP global advisory council (GAC) of the World Economic Forum (WEF). In 2015, he received the Infosys Prize in Humanities in 2015 for his work on legal education and on democratising the discourse around intellectual property law and policy. The jury was headed by Nobel laureate, Prof Amartya Sen. Professional History: After graduating from the NLS, Bangalore Professor Basheer joinedAnand and Anand, one of India’s leading IP firms. He went on to head their telecommunication and technology practice and was rated by the IFLR as a leading technology lawyer. He left for the University of Oxford to pursue post-graduate studies, completing the BCL, MPhil and DPhil as a Wellcome Trust scholar. His first academic appointment was at the George Washington University Law School, where he served as the Frank H Marks Visiting Associate Professor of IP Law. He then relocated to India in 2008 to take up the MHRD Chaired Professorship in IP Law at WB NUJS, a leading Indian law school. Prof Basheer has published widely and his articles have won awards, including those instituted by ATRIP and the Stanford Technology Law Review. He is consulted widely by the government, industry, international organisations and civil society on a variety of IP issues. He also serves on several government committees.

Patent Trademark

Creative Ways of Cutting Pendency: Abandonment vs Allowance?


The BRICS block (comprising Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) are a major force to contend with. For these countries are seen as potential world leaders (if not already). Along with Annalisa Primi, a stellar economist, I co-authored a paper some years ago referring to these countries as “Technologically Proficient Developing Countries” (TPDCs). And hoped that some of these countries would break out of the standard IP script (driven in large part by the developed world) and carve out…


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Patent

Delhi High Court Makes Clear that Patent Working Information is not “Confidential”


The Delhi high court order on “patent working” that we blogged about earlier is now available on our resource page here. As you can see, it is a very well reasoned order. And one of the few decisions that is not unduly long winded, but short, crisp and legally lucid. Here are the key excerpts from the decision. Am reproducing the introductory paragraphs of the courts ruling, since the court captures the core essence of the petition quite well. The court…


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Others Patent

SpicyIP Interview Series (1): Justice Prabha Sridevan on Life, Laughter and IP


As promised in our new year post on the relativity of “newness” (and the impending death of the patent system), we bring to you our freshly minted SpicyIP Interview series. And who better to kick this off than the inimitable Justice Prabha Sridevan. She hardly needs an introduction, as her legacy is stamped indelibly on many a fine Indian IP decision (which she penned both as high court judge and later, as the Chairman of the Intellectual Property Appellate Tribunal[IPAB])….


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Patent

Obsessing on Newness: The Death of Patents?


And it’s the dawn of another New Year. With “new” resolutions, resolves and all of that. But as a witty whatsapp forward notes, this one is rather special. For our millennium has just come of age! Its’ turned 18 (2018) —the age of majority in most countries. So hopefully we’ll see the show shaping of adulthood this year. But what of IP? IP is about “newness” after all. And, as a society, we’re obsessed with newness. Ti’s only fitting therefore…


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Innovation Patent

Are Patents Property: India vs United States


In a recent brief filed before the United States Supreme Court, the US government argued that patents are not property! For those not in the know, this relates to a monumental constitutional challenge (Oil States Energy vs Green’s Energy Group) to a proceeding at the US patent office called the Inter-Partes Review (IPR), where third parties can contest the grant of a patent. A bit similar to our post grant opposition proceeding. Under US law, you cannot divest someone of…


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Trademark

Breaking News: Toyota Loses Trademark Battle over Prius at Indian Supreme Court


In a path-breaking development for Indian trademark law, the Supreme Court reiterated yesterday that IP rights are “territorial” and not “global”. The court was deciding a matter involving “Prius”, the brand under which Toyota sells its leading “hybrid” car. The court held that merely because Prius is well known outside India does not mean that it enjoys a “reputation” in India as well. That has to be independently established! The court’s decision is a delight to read, not least because…


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Biological Diversity Patent Plant Variety Protection

Pest Policy: Confusion, Capture or a Fetish for the Foreign?


Policy-making is curious business. Particularly when it comes to technology. How else does one explain the following conundrum confronting our agro-biotech landscape? One the one had, the government appears more or less convinced that BT cotton (patented technology belonging to Monsanto) has developed pest resistance (against the pink Bollworm) and does not work anymore. And yet on the other, it wants this patented technology to disseminate widely in a cheaper and more accessible manner to the poor farmer. Forcing one…


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Privacy

Privacy, Publicity and Media Mistakes


Tis’ one of the most enduring paradoxes. That our right to privacy verdict became one of the most “public” ever! The sheer number of public comments that sprung up in its wake is testament to this sentiment. At last count, there appeared to be more than 300 articles and commentaries on this judgment alone; all within a span of a month or so! In fact, just a week or so back, we at IDIA did a full panel on privacy…


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Others

Judging Judges: Rule of Reason?


In an opinion piece for the Hindu, I reflect on one of the most monumental milestones ever in Indian legal history. Namely the opening up of our judicial “collegium” and its secretive decision making processes to the public eye. Given the secrecy with which Collegium decisions/deliberations were shrouded for over two decades now, this is nothing short of revolutionary! Unfortunately, this new transparency notwithstanding, we are still left in the dark as to the “metric” used for measuring judicial “merit”….


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Patent

Nobody Puts Beautiful (IP) Babies in a Corner!


  Babies are a boon for some. And a bane for others! Particularly brand name owners who find their names being appropriated by pirate parents who think nothing of marring their young ones with “marks”. Think Sony Singh, Google Ganguly or even Nokia Nair (a fine one for those South of the Vindhyas). For those interested, I did a post on branded babies some years ago. More recently (last year in fact), babies featured in a heated IP battle involving…


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